hummingwolf: squiggly symbol floating over rippling water (one)
Hey, guys! It's Summer Rerun time! This is an entry from 2005 which I am reposting for two reasons: (A) I still like my answers, and (B) I want to see all of yours! Please, if you happen to be interested in writing out your own answers to this survey--or if you happen to be bored and can't think of anything better to do that doesn't put you at risk of prolonged incarceration, extreme injury, or imminent death--please post your own answers to your own journal!

Because I'm curious, that's why. Or because I said so. Whichever answer works for you. Now, on to the show!

~~~~~~

Questions taken from the "What religion do you fit in with?" quiz going around. Answers are my own. [Edit: Original URL removed due to uselessness. Quiz may now be found at this location should anyone care to find out their own results.]

Do you believe that man was created in the form of God, or that man evolved from other species?

Both. I don't believe in results without processes. That isn't how creation works for humans--and if we were made in the image of a Creator, why would we expect process-free results from Him?

Are you a believer that you should try everything at least once?

Oh, I should try being tortured to death, dying of lung cancer, dying of heart attack, dying of gunshot wounds... erm, no. No, I believe that some things are better left untried, thanks.

What do you trust more, your feelings/intuition or your logic/rational capabilities?

I think that feelings without logic lead only to madness, and I feel that logic without emotion ignores a necessary part of the data. Reasoning and feelings are both essential. That's why we've got them.

Do you plan to recant on your deathbed?

I don't believe I've canted enough. Or cantered. I definitely should canter more often, perhaps with a cantor along.

Do you often find different ways of expressing your own spirituality?

I am a spiritual animal. Everything I do is a way of expressing my spirituality, as well as my animality.

Do you believe in any kind of afterlife?

Yes.

Do you believe in capital punishment?

Yes, there are too many reports of capital punishment taking place throughout the world for me not to believe in it.

Oh, I know, I know, "believe" in these two questions is not meant in the same way. Then again, maybe it is: Maybe "believe" in both cases means, not "Do you think this is true?" but "Do you think this is the way things should be, whether they are or not?" In that case: I believe that some people deserve to die, but that the judicial system is currently too fallible for me to endorse capital punishment whole-heartedly. Also: I'm not sure I believe that an afterlife should exist--maybe this world really should be all that we get, but I don't think that it is.
More questions and answers inside! )

"Religion" survey

Tuesday, October 18th, 2005 11:59 am
hummingwolf: squiggly symbol floating over rippling water (one)
Questions taken from the "What religion do you fit in with?" quiz going around. Answers are my own.

Do you believe that man was created in the form of God, or that man evolved from other species?

Both. I don't believe in results without processes. That isn't how creation works for humans--and if we were made in the image of a Creator, why would we expect process-free results from Him?

Are you a believer that you should try everything at least once?

Oh, I should try being tortured to death, dying of lung cancer, dying of heart attack, dying of gunshot wounds... erm, no. No, I believe that some things are better left untried, thanks.

What do you trust more, your feelings/intuition or your logic/rational capabilities?

I think that feelings without logic lead only to madness, and I feel that logic without emotion ignores a necessary part of the data. Reasoning and feelings are both essential. That's why we've got them.

Do you plan to recant on your deathbed?

I don't believe I've canted enough. Or cantered. I definitely should canter more often, perhaps with a cantor along.

Do you often find different ways of expressing your own spirituality?

I am a spiritual animal. Everything I do is a way of expressing my spirituality, as well as my animality.

Do you believe in any kind of afterlife?

Yes.

Do you believe in capital punishment?

Yes, there are too many reports of capital punishment taking place throughout the world for me not to believe in it.

Oh, I know, I know, "believe" in these two questions is not meant in the same way. Then again, maybe it is: Maybe "believe" in both cases means, not "Do you think this is true?" but "Do you think this is the way things should be, whether they are or not?" In that case: I believe that some people deserve to die, but that the judicial system is currently too fallible for me to endorse capital punishment whole-heartedly. Also: I'm not sure I believe that an afterlife should exist--maybe this world really should be all that we get, but I don't think that it is.
More questions and answers inside! )

(no subject)

Tuesday, May 10th, 2005 01:55 pm
hummingwolf: animation of green and gold fractal, number of iterations increasing with time (Iterations in green and gold)
Woese is postulating a golden age of pre-Darwinian life, during which horizontal gene transfer was universal and separate species did not exist. Life was then a community of cells of various kinds, sharing their genetic information so that clever chemical tricks and catalytic processes invented by one creature could be inherited by all of them. Evolution was a communal affair, the whole community advancing in metabolic and reproductive efficiency as the genes of the most efficient cells were shared. But then, one evil day, a cell resembling a primitive bacterium happened to find itself one jump ahead of its neighbors in efficiency. That cell separated itself from the community and refused to share. Its offspring became the first species. With its superior efficiency, it continued to prosper and to evolve separately....

And now, in the last 30 years, Homo sapiens has revived the ancient pre-Darwinian practice of horizontal gene transfer, moving genes easily from microbes to plants and animals, blurring the boundaries between species. We are moving rapidly into the post-Darwinian era, when species will no longer exist, and the evolution of life will again be communal.

The above link via this Language Log post.

In science news, changing vegetation might make severe weather worse. "Earth's climate is all about relationships, and this study shows that ground cover plays a significant part in determining changes in climate extremes.... climate change will affect what vegetation grows where and that those vegetation changes can feed back to further change the mean climate state. But this is the first insight we've had into whether those vegetation changes will also change the frequency and magnitude of extreme temperature and precipitation events, such as droughts and severe storms."

Today, [livejournal.com profile] skygypsy posted this link on bundle theory and this other link on bundle theory. Something I read behind that second link forced me to link to Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem.

If any of you can write a coherent essay connecting all of the above links plus the ones in yesterday's post, I shall give you a cookie.

A bit of my wayward mind is trying to get me to write said essay, but I'd really much rather have the cookie.

Misbegotten

Wednesday, January 19th, 2005 12:00 pm
hummingwolf: Snowflake-like kaleidoscope images (Kaleidocoolth)
First of all: It's snowing! And I can't see it because the storm windows are fogged up. Phooey.

Second: I was thinking about my book collection again. You see, I inherited all of my parents' books; my parents inherited my father's parents' books; and my father's parents inherited books from book collectors who happened to live on the same street. Add in the fact that everyone in this chain bought books of their own, and you'll understand that there are a lot of books involved here.

Exactly how many books there are is something no-one can be sure of. When I first moved into a rented room, it was obvious that all my books had to go elsewhere, so they are now stored in many boxes in another part of the state. (If they were close by, then I would sell many of them on eBay, as there's certainly something of value in there that I don't really want to read. But I digress.) The part that frightens me is that, though my brother is close enough to them to know how many boxes of books there are, the number of boxes has increased dramatically through the years. The only possible explanations are (1) my brother exaggerates the number a bit more with each telling, or (2) the books are breeding. Since my brother would tell you that he never exaggerates, well, the resulting collection must have gotten interesting.

Many of the books are either self-help books or science books. As some of you already know, I can't wait to read my fresh young copy of How to Win Friends and Influence the Origin of Species!

Was idly wondering how well Dune would get along with The Book of Mormon. Then thoughts of a eugenics book from the 1920s intruded. Eep. But suddenly I thought of a more disturbing scenario--Dune gets together with one of the many Amway books. The Kwisatz Haderach would like to tell you about a business opportunity...

The two authors I've bought the most books by are C.J. Cherryh and C.S. Lewis. Was wondering how well their books would get along, but realized that Till We Have Faces and Rusalka would have much to talk about.

How well would Invisible Man by H.G. Wells and Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison get along? Speaking of Ellisons, Ralph and Harlan would make an interesting combination.

Oh, Douglas Adams and Laura Ingalls Wilder--Little House at the End of the Universe.

I'm trying to think of who the old copy of The Handbook of Chemistry and Physics would socialize with. Any suggestions? I have the feeling that it would be mocking the 1909 Science-History of the Universe while A Brief History of Time was snickering in the corner.

Though Dad was a lifelong Republican, his girlfriend talked about Al Gore's book a lot and I suspect there's a copy of it around somewhere, but who would hang out with it?

Plato's Republic and Orwell's Animal Farm--catfight!

The Screwtape Letters and The Devil's Dictionary might get along less well than you'd think.

Which is the more likely result from a meeting of Austen and Dostoevsky: Crime and Prejudice or Pride and Punishment?

So many bad jokes can be made about the Melville. I will not say anything about crosses with inspirational books, so you won't be hearing about The Power of Positive Dick.

There are L. Ron Hubbard books. I hope they don't breed with anybody.

The Odyssey would be interesting crossed with pretty much any SF book, really. And you know Odysseus would get along well with Huckleberry Finn, though cultural differences could confuse things.

The Lion, The Witch, and The Last of the Mohicans?

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Chips.

Do Androids Dream of the Federalist Papers?

The Joy of Sex in Wonderland. No comment.
hummingwolf: Part of a julia fractal in colors of fire and smoke. (Fire-flavored fractal)
I desperately want to convince myself that I have nothing in common with the people who desperately want to convince themselves that they have nothing in common with the people who disagree with them; but even as tired and ickly as I am, I can't quite manage to ignore that particular absurdity.

So it seems to be a natural feature of the hnau of this planet to try to place everyone into a little box as we decide who is like us, who is unlike us. And the ones who are unlike us and who we happen not to like must be wholly unlike us, incomprehensible to us and uncomprehending of us. This saves us time. If we already know that we will never understand nor be understood, then all the hard work of communicating may safely be skipped over and we can go straight to the vilification and the fighting. We're so much smarter than they are, anyway. We have logic, intuition, morality, and common sense on our side, you know. If our opponents do not recognize this, it is only proof of their inferiority.

Said a few days ago to the incredible [livejournal.com profile] skygypsy: "if you simply must define yourself, define yourself in a way that leaves your box open-ended. Define yourself as the efflorescence resulting from the collision of a jack-in-the-box and a distant sun. Call yourself a cross between an African tea rose and a pan flute. Explain calmly that you are what happens when an iridescent sense of justice is painted with pink polka-dots. But don't tell people you're a mixture of a wolf and a hummingbird, because your totem animal has that one covered." I did pick my name, this cross between two disparate creatures, as a way of trying to escape being categorized as one thing or another based on my handle. Of course, people categorize you anyway. They assume gender, religion, fashion statements based on nothing more than a name. Let them see your face or learn about your past history, and they become certain of incontrovertible facts about your psychology and your potential future based on nothing more substantial than side effects of genetics and circumstance. It makes things interesting.

If you are foolish enough to engage my opponents in debate, they will commit the logical fallacy of making appeals to authority, stating that X must be true, unquestioningly, simply because some high leader or spurious bit of scripture stated X. We do not commit that fallacy. When we cite authority, everyone knows that our authority is always right.

Sometimes they will try to convince you of something by stating that "Everyone knows X is true," that all the ignorant masses gathered in their herd like sheep must be bleating in unison because of some self-evident truth. But everyone knows that throughout history the majority has frequently been altogether in the wrong. When we appeal to common sense, we do so only when the truth clearly is obvious to every sane and rational person.

Our opponents, when questioned, will add to their words many specious and complicated arguments in a feeble attempt to hide the evident contradictions of their position. When they complain that we seem to be contradicting and overcomplicate our arguments, it is because they have no appreciation for the beauties of subtlety and paradox.

There really is no arguing with these people. We have nothing in common.

There really is no arguing with these people. We are far too much alike.

(no subject)

Saturday, August 7th, 2004 07:29 pm
hummingwolf: squiggly symbol floating over rippling water (Kaleidoscope (purple & white))
The old Oasis song "Champagne Supernova" has been running through my head all day. Only my brain has rewritten the song so it's "Campaign Supernova," forming the soundtrack to a vision of John Kerry and George Dubya Bush at a presidential debate, reaching out to shake hands but as their fingers make contact, a flash of blinding white light envelops the two men, the platform, the room. As the light fades, we see the debris of a ruined world, bloody flames consuming buildings, cars, people--and a grinning Dick Cheney lurches toward John Edwards, both men miraculous survivors though looking rather the worse for wear, Dick reaching out his hand to John's, John with a deer-in-the-headlights look, mouthing "No no no" over and over but unable to move from the spot...

What's that? Oh, just water, green tea, rooibos, the usual. No, no, nothing alcoholic; why do you ask?
hummingwolf: squiggly symbol floating over rippling water (one)
"Additionally, Dr. ----- reports that Ms. ----- only has 10% use of her hands, fingers, and arms for grasping, turning, or twisting objects, fine manipulations, or reaching."

The sentence struck me as absurd. Granting that the words were written as part of a process of appealing for disabilty benefits, I couldn't help wondering if someone had misunderstood something somehow. Ten percent use of these hands, these arms? I looked at them, flexing my fingers. The skin's dry, opening in small cracks on two of the knuckles. Blue veins run over muscles you can watch working along the arm as the fingers move. These are not hands you'd see in an advertisement for moisturizer or dishwashing soap. Still, they're not what you'd expect from the sentence above. At least, they're not what I would expect.

Thinking of the reasons why I never got a job after graduating from the training school a couple years ago, my hands are nowhere near the top of my list. They type 80 words per minute, for Pete's sake!--faster if I've been practicing. All right, I knew that my manual dexterity tested below the fifth percentile. And it's long been obvious that I'm not someone you'd want flipping burgers at your favorite fast-food joint, carrying fragile objects, using needle and thread on anything you wouldn't want stained by my blood, or performing surgery. As for upper-body strength, it's not much, never has been. Opening a fresh jar of my favorite salsa is an exercise in absurdity that can take longer than anything else I do in the kitchen. Reaching my arms up and lifting are actions with unpredictable results. But something about that number, 10 percent, leaves me struggling to make sense of it. It sounds like I should be someone who can't tie her shoes in the morning or unlock the front door. I don't get it.

I look at my hands again, asking them what they make of all this. They tell me they want to give someone a backrub. Not quite the answer I was looking for.

(no subject)

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2004 03:21 pm
hummingwolf: squiggly symbol floating over rippling water (8 months)
When the founders of Little Elves Preschool in Virginia named their new school, they never dreamed that one day the students would gather in a ring, playing wild, unearthly music that would make the teacher dance until she dropped dead from exhaustion. More's the pity.

I probably shouldn't watch the morning news. Little things like seeing that icy conditions have made Little Elves Preschool open one hour late tend to make me think too much.

(no subject)

Sunday, May 4th, 2003 10:27 pm
hummingwolf: Drawing of a creature that is part-wolf, part-hummingbird. (Hummingwolf by Dandelion)
After recuperating upstairs for a couple hours last night, I went back down to where the party was and listened to some more conversation as I munched on pizza and cookies. When people left a little while later, they called out to me things along the lines of, "It was good to meet you!" It's a common little cliche, isn't it? Tell somebody you just met that you're happy to meet them. But you never know that the first time. Unless you've got good instincts or they've got good references, you don't know if the person you just met can be trusted. You don't know that soon if they'll take all your money, break your heart, ruin your reputation, or generally be the worst thing that ever happened to you. Yet you call out to them as they leave, "It was a pleasure to meet you!"

One of my friends from college was the kind of guy who seems to know everybody, always great at networking and attracting folks from a wide variety of backgrounds (and foregrounds). After we'd been good friends for over a year, he turned to me one day at lunch and said, "It was good to meet you!" There was a sensible man.
hummingwolf: Drawing of a creature that is part-wolf, part-hummingbird. (Hummingwolf by Dandelion)
It seemed strange that my application for benefits with the county would go through without a hitch after my brother called (and apparently said nothing particularly original or informative to the caseworker), though the caseworker told me repeatedly a few months ago that I could not get benefits without having a third party fill out that additional form stating they'd take responsibility for my extra expenses. So what made the difference this month? Well, I looked at the letters the county sent in the mail this week, and saw that the computer believes I have no expenses at all--no rent, no utilities, nothing.

Right. I need to remember in the future: The more you need money, the less likely you are to get money. I'd forgotten that.

In other news, last night's chat topics included sex, spam, and teakettles. How many out there reading this would go to a movie titled Sex, Spam, and Teakettles? I know I sure would! I should probably spare you all the weird mental images inspired by the spam guaranteeing "Permenent Erection Growth," though I find it hard to believe nobody else reading that would think of an erection surviving the death of the universe and wonder how the growth could continue after all the matter in the universe had been incorporated into it. Maybe I should stop paying attention to spam subject lines, eh?

Morning notes

Wednesday, March 26th, 2003 08:56 am
hummingwolf: Drawing of a creature that is part-wolf, part-hummingbird. (Hummingwolf by Dandelion)
This is how my brain works: Last night in chat, DC mentioned something about Pork Riblets. After asking if "Riblets" was a brand name, I babbled on about the word making me think of ribs and ribbits (frog sounds) at the same time, which got me trying to remember if frogs have ribs (forgive me, this was late at night and my memory was halfway to sleep). So after trying to remember something about the 10th-grade frog dissection other than the fact that our group's frog's brains were insufficiently scrambled and it kept trying to crawl out of the bag it was stored in, I grabbed the Franco to Goethals volume of the encyclopedia off the shelf and found myself looking at drawings of froggie vertebrae until I spied the label for the frog's Achilles tendon, which set me off thinking about what an amphibian Trojan war would be like. What ruse would Greek frogs use to get inside the city? Frogs tend not to ride horses into battle, you know. DC was a bit nonplussed when I told him he had to come up with an answer before I could go to bed or I'd be lying awake all night wondering about different wooden devices to be hidden in. Finally he came up with wooden lilypads (too flat), wooden flies, and wooden toadstools. Anybody else have other ideas?

In other news: Walked over three miles two days in a row. Amazingly still feeling capable of walking this morning, in spite of getting too little sleep. Hooray!

(no subject)

Saturday, December 7th, 2002 09:44 am
hummingwolf: squiggly symbol floating over rippling water (Default)
Lately I find myself constantly thinking how to act, how I'm supposed to act. I must concentrate on acting like I am happy when I am happy, on acting like I'm in pain when I'm in pain, on acting like I'm afraid the landlord will kick me out when I'm afraid the landlord will kick me out. No reaction can be my instinctive reaction; my innate behavior is not good enough. I don't act enough like me. I don't know how.

How do I act like the person I am? What would she do in the situation I'm in? Well, why don't I ask her? Oh, she can't answer me clearly, she's just confused. Better ask someone else.

All the world is a stage, and all the men and women merely players. But I haven't learned my lines yet! And I'm certain this isn't the part I tried out for. They have their exits and their entrances, and one man in his time plays many parts, while I stand in the wings trying to figure out my motivation for this scene.

Randomness

Thursday, October 31st, 2002 12:15 pm
hummingwolf: squiggly symbol floating over rippling water (Default)
Today's random phrase from my subconscious: "fevered lizard."

As cold-blooded animals, lizards cannot become fevered unless they are overheated. Is my subconscious mind trying to tell me that I am overly stressed and need to move to a cooler, calmer environment?

Interestingly, infected lizards will induce fevers in themselves by moving to warmer areas if at all possible, and studies have shown that laboratory lizards who are allowed to do this recover from their infections more quickly than lizards who remain cool. Maybe my subconscious mind is trying to tell me that in order to fight some disease of the soul I need to move myself into a more exciting place?

Or maybe my subconscious just thinks that "Fevered Lizard" would be a great name for a rock band.

~~~~~

In other developments, because I arrived at the Social Services office today too late for an interview, I now have an appointment for Monday morning at 8 a.m. Have I mentioned lately how much of a morning person I'm not? I'm gonna have to wake up before sunrise! It's not natural! ::whine::

(Little-known fact: The hummingwolf was once a morning person. She outgrew it.)

Other plans for today: Wait for people in assorted offices to return from lunch and make some necessary phone calls. I hate that my life these days revolves around the telephone. Why can't the folks I need to talk to for disability & job hunt related things correspond by e-mail like sensible people? Sheesh.

Okay, it's Halloween--time for chocolate.
hummingwolf: squiggly symbol floating over rippling water (Default)
Max Ehrmann--
You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars, you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.

Stephen Crane--
A man said to the universe,
"Sir, I exist!"
"However," replied the universe,
"The fact has not created in me
A sense of obligation."


Which of course ignores the possibility that the universe, even if completely devoid of any sense of obligation, may in fact love its offspring anyway.

Which of course wouldn't mean that the universe is unfolding as it should, for even those who love us can treat us badly. Perhaps it is those who love us most who damage us most efficiently.

(no subject)

Friday, August 9th, 2002 11:53 pm
hummingwolf: squiggly symbol floating over rippling water (Default)
I keep getting spam offering me free teens. Why on earth would anyone want a teenager? They're so annoying at that age, don't you think? I get mental images of these websites being run by irritated parents trying to get rid of their kids for a few years. Then I see in my mind's eye big cardboard boxes of teens set out on the front porch like a litter of kittens with signs hung round their necks saying "Free to a Good Home" while the parents hover nearby explaining that they'd like to keep the teens themselves--they're so cute, aren't they?--but of course they can't afford so many, what with the cost of all the snack foods required. But one--just one--that won't be such a problem, will it? And it's free, and isn't it cute the way it primps and preens and worries so much and thinks its little problems are the worst things that could ever happen in the whole history of the world? Please, just take one...




(Yes, I know that's not what the spammers are really offering. I like my version better.)

(no subject)

Saturday, July 27th, 2002 12:06 am
hummingwolf: squiggly symbol floating over rippling water (Default)
If we are what we eat and we keep eating it, are we cannibals?






(It's just possible that I need more sleep in my life.)

(no subject)

Tuesday, June 25th, 2002 09:10 am
hummingwolf: (two)
I try hard to be an open-minded person. By "open-minded" I mean not that I think all ideas are equally valid, but that I try to keep in mind that I can be wrong, that there is a possibility that ideas which I do not currently believe may have some explanatory power, some truth value greater than zippo. So when I hear some flaky idea, I do not dismiss it; rather, I try to put myself within the new frame of reference, see through other people's eyes, and discover what this alternate way of seeing could tell me about the world. Even if I ultimately reject the idea, I continue to try to respect its power. I understand that a person who holds a belief I consider mistaken is not necessarily stupid or insane; and that even if they are insane, that fact alone does not automatically make them wrong.

But even as open-minded as I try to be, there are some concepts I have difficulty with. For instance, I have lately been grappling with the hypothesis that all the beliefs which ordinary people consider loony are, in fact, loony. It turns out that I am very strongly prejudiced against this particular idea.

Maybe my problem is with the ordinary people. After all, it was the regular kids who made my childhood a living hell while the freaks and weirdos often proved the kindest friends. Or maybe my problem is with the fact that normal types tend to base their arguments, not on anything resembling logic, but on something they refer to as "common sense." They don't bother to define common sense. They don't bother to explain why their common sense is so obviously true while the common sense of the vast majority of other cultures in other places and times is so obviously unenlightened. And "common sense" types really don't help their case when they argue that their ideas are based on modern scientific principles while at the same time arguing that some concept from the lunatic fringe must be untrue because it is absurd. Hello? Have these people even heard of quantum physics??

Eep. I really shouldn't try thinking actual thoughts when it's 88 degrees in my room.

(no subject)

Friday, June 21st, 2002 09:07 pm
hummingwolf: squiggly symbol floating over rippling water (Default)
Ever get the urge to rend the fabric of reality and use the tattered rags to dust your living room?

(no subject)

Saturday, May 11th, 2002 01:55 pm
hummingwolf: squiggly symbol floating over rippling water (Default)
According to Jamie Kellner, chairman and CEO of Turner Broadcasting, every time you skip over a commercial or take too many bathroom breaks during commercial time, you are stealing the programming, you thief.

In other news, three members of a Florida family received microchip implants on Friday, as you can read about here and here and here and various other places. So far, these chips are essentially high-tech versions of MedicAlert bracelets, containing information which hospital technicians can scan in an emergency in order to provide the best care.

One day, however, you know that these chips will be able to send information about your location and medical status to some central database. And on that day, if you are detected leaving the room during commercial breaks without a valid medical excuse as determined by a panel of experts, you will be fined accordingly. Additionally, your monthly bill for certain premium cable channels may be raised if your hormone levels are regularly found to exceed expected levels during late-night programming hours. Please plan your budget accordingly.
hummingwolf: (two)
It finally hit me today: I'm officially sick of those cute little online quizzes with all the multiple-choice questions that somehow fail to include any choices I would ever make. Why can't I finish one of these quizzes without having to answer questions as if I were somebody else entirely? Is it some sort of law nobody bothered to tell me about? Hypothetical-Me has completed more of those things than I ever could and I tell you I'm sick of that wench. Why should I care which member of the Osbournes she is when I've never even watched the show? If some stupid test says she's X% gay, what relevance does it have to my life? And as for mythological creatures, I'm neither the phoenix nor the dragon she's been labeled as: I am the Hummingwolf, and it isn't my fault that Homer and the rest of the poets didn't bother to write about me. (Pervy Ovid was jealous of my relationship with Hermes, but that's an old rivalry I won't go into now.)

Bah. If I take another multiple-choice test within the next 30 days, somebody please shoot me.

Little boxes

Sunday, February 24th, 2002 09:44 am
hummingwolf: squiggly symbol floating over rippling water (Default)
A few days ago in response to a question on a mailing list poll, I wrote:

"10. Good or bad boy?

"Many people in this culture equate 'bad' with 'sexy,' but when I think 'bad' I think lying, cheating, cruel and abusive and I don't see any damn sex appeal in all that. If people don't *mean* bad, I wish they wouldn't *say* bad.

"Grrr... as most of you have guessed, I tend to be put into the 'sweet & innocent' category. Then when I don't blush every time somebody mentions sex, I get moved into the "whore" category because, of course, there are only two types of women, right? Then when I don't express great willingness to rush into bed with some guy, he puts me in the 'bitch' category, which label, coming from the men who usually seem to think this way, I mostly consider an honor."

Also in response to the same poll:

"I didn't answer many questions, did I? Sorry, labels and unnatural black/white situations have been getting on my nerves today. I am weary of people putting themselves and each other into little boxes."

So, naturally, being the hater of little boxes that I am, I've got some more quiz results. )

(no subject)

Monday, February 18th, 2002 06:20 pm
hummingwolf: squiggly symbol floating over rippling water (Default)
At a local Spanish grocery, two small Buddhas are watching over the Bubblicious. There was also one of the Catholic saints there, but I forget whether she presided over the cash register or the cigarettes.

An old poll

Thursday, January 31st, 2002 10:15 am
hummingwolf: squiggly symbol floating over rippling water (Default)
I'm too tired to think of something original to say this morning (I've been trying), so here's a poll I wrote back in October for a mailing list I'm on.

-----

After skipping class yesterday on the theory that it would be a
waste of time to do my course requiring Internet access if they
hadn't gotten the DSL yet, today I missed class 'cos I'm feeling
sick. My body's timing stinks. Anyway, since my mind is
wandering everywhere, here's a poll.


1. Do you see the forest or the trees?
A. I see the forest.
B. I see the trees.
C. I see a complex interplay of color and form.
D. My eyes are oozing too much for me to see anything,
okay? Now could you please hand me those antihistamines?

My answer:
Most of the time C. If I'm in the middle of the forest, it's A
unless the canopy is so thick that very little sunlight gets
through, in which case it's either B or nada. If I am within
100 miles of a forest and it's spring pollinating season, the
answer is an emphatic D.


2. You are awakened in the middle of the night by your
exceedingly apologetic fairy godmother. There have been these
budget cutbacks, you see, which is why she hasn't been around
much lately. But now she's here, and she's offering you a
choice of gifts. Apologizing once again, she informs you that
in accepting any one of these gifts, you are eliminating your
chances of receiving any of the others within the next five
years. Which do you choose?
A. A portfolio of the most valuable stocks in all the
hottest industries.
B. Your own syndicated TV show, appearing in all major
markets.
C. Perfect health.
D. Your dream man/woman.
E. A home which functions as a perfect sanctuary from the
outside world.
F. The library of Alexandria, restored--and the ability to
read and understand it.
Read more... )

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